• RobertLeeDavis
    42
    ljcf743k2605f8ki.png
    Attachment
    Chicken Run (515K)
  • shutterbuggy
    15
    So cute. He's putting a ton of effort into his mission. I'm rooting for him.

    Great feet, Bob. Powerful. Purposeful.

    A++

    Happy painting,
    Rita
  • Robyn
    13
    Bob, she is fantasic! So funny and I like the double meaning in your title. A terrific style here and great detail. She (or is it an immature he... ) looks kind of harassed which is fitting since s/he has the need to run. Very big and solid feet to help her along.
    Question... what is the 1st thing a chicken does after scratching a worm or something to eat out of the ground. They all do it... and all do it exactly the same. If you discover one that doesn't then s/he is an odd bod. O:) Rob.
  • Vivienne
    7
    Hope he gets to the other side quickly. He is so cute and very determined Bob. Love those big strong feet and the expression is priceless. Love him lots.
    Vivienne
  • Don Decker
    58
    It's funny ,good work,Don
  • Isla
    19
    Hi BVob

    Absolutely love your chicken run - you have captured him/her beautifully - definitely on a mission - probably trying to get the best of the food on offer before all the others twig on.

    Cheers Isla
  • RobertLeeDavis
    42
    Thank you all for the great comments. This was fun. I had the idea in my head before I started rather than my usual doodle until I see something. If anyone would like to see the steps from start to finish I'll post it.

    bd
  • shutterbuggy
    15
    Please post the steps, Bob. It will be fun to see how you developed this delightful chicken.

    Happy painting,
    Rita
  • RobertLeeDavis
    42
    Rita, I haven't tried this before so let's see how it goes.

    kch5pvhpfy7ylmp8.jpg
    Usually I start with a doodle. This time I had the concept, so I sketched it. Often I work the sketch a little before I save it and open in a new page to continue.

    vht3i3sgwlxli349.jpg
    Now I'm working on 4 or 5 layers. I know I want a dark underlay. I also know the anatomy is wrong on the leg but I'm thinking I like the sorta human looking structure.

    qu659qye92elcwpf.jpg
    I couldn't take the pressure. I went to a more realistic anatomy - for a chicken. Even more layers. 10 to 20 is normal on a picture. Full size is about 1200 pixels wide. I'm working on some of the details and picked a background color. I'm changing some of the details. I paint, then erase, then repeat until I'm done. Digital is so perfect for me. Sometimes I think it's 2D sculpture.

    khq3sq6yvecezhoa.jpg
    Refining and checking out some texture. I selected a frame earlier than usual - last.

    09l2z1xdadjwb11a.jpg
    I figured out the wing. I adjusted the light and shadows. Then I quit.

    I guess it worked. The preview looked OK.

    I hope I entertained.

    bd
    Attachments
    1 (9K)
    2 (14K)
    3 (12K)
    4 (14K)
    5 (15K)
  • Robyn
    13
    Bob, thanks for showing your steps. It's amazing what a different look the leg shape makes. He looks like he's struggling to get away from something in your original, bent leg like an old man who can't get around much anymore, which was a good plan for your bird though. I like it too.
    The leg on the final one makes this chicken look strong with all the push he needs in that foot of his to succeed in his run. . O:) Rob
  • Vivienne
    7
    Thanks for sharing Bob. It is great to see how you started off, repaired a leg and then it was all go from there.
    Vivienne
  • shutterbuggy
    15
    Excellent!

    Thanks ever so much, Bob, for showing the evolution of your running chicken. I almost always start with a primitive outline sketch. With mine, I know what the outline is supposed to be. Other people don't always. Ha ha.

    Here, I like seeing how the wing and rear leg/foot developed. Such fun! You're so skilled and talented.

    I typically work with 2048 H x 1536 W or 1536 H x 2058 W, each at 300 dpi. Even at this size, I have to zoom in close 3/4 of the time. And I use lots of layers, like you. Because I like to save every step of the design stage, I typically save three-to-four tbr files (WIP 1, WIP 2, Wip 3, and a final tbr) for each project. That way, I can toss layers (or merge them) in successive WIP tbr files without losing data that I may want to revisit.

    Happy designing and painting,
    Rita
  • RobertLeeDavis
    42
    Rita, we do work a lot alike. TB makes the processes really easy. I save EVERYTHING I paint. I like saving multiple pages because I sometimes I go in a direction that isn't working and I'm in too deep to undo it all, so I go back a step and do over.

    bd
  • Spuddy
    38
    great piece bob thanks for the evolution pics as well
    dave
  • RobertLeeDavis
    42
    Thanks Dave.

    bd
  • shutterbuggy
    15


    Exactly! Also, when you go off on an aside that turns into something totally different, you can return to your original idea and develop it in the way you thought you were going.

    Happy painting,
    Rita
bold
italic
underline
strike
code
quote
ulist
image
url
mention
reveal
youtube
tweet
Add a Comment

Welcome to the Pixarra forum!

Feel free to look around, read posts and view images. Create an account to share some of your own thoughts or artwork, it's Free!